The Benefits of Outdoor Exercise, Adventure

Group of people kayaking with the words Outdoor Exercise written across

The World Health Organization recommends that adults get at least 75 minutes of vigorous exercise, or 150 minutes of moderate exercise, each week. But it can be tough. Between your job and your kids, it’s hard to find time to do the things you want to do, let alone something you don’t particularly want to do, like exercise.

“The best advice is to keep in mind that any amount of activity is better than none and it’s important to select exercise that is consistent with your goals,” says Brian Parr, associate professor of exercise and sports science at the University of South Carolina-Aiken.

Let’s face it; not everyone enjoys the gym. Maybe it’s time to “think outside the barbell,” says Dr. Marc Tinsley. “One of the main problems is that people associate exercise with a gym or equipment. Fitness isn’t about sweat, six-packs, and sex appeal; it’s about having enough energy to do your activities of daily living safely and effectively.” In other words, make exercise fun!

It is so important to find a physical activity that you want to do – that you look forward to. Otherwise, you will find it incredibly hard to stick to your exercise routine. Our suggestion: take it outside!

“Sports such as hiking, canoeing, swimming, racket and ball sports and numerous other physical activities give you more choices for enjoyable exercise, which is likely to keep you motivated,” says Tina Pashley of LIVESTRONG.

It’s really all about finding what works best for Y-O-U. If you enjoy hiking, go for a hike. If you like kayaking, go kayaking. And if you prefer sports, find a league near you. There are no limitations to how you exercise. The only important thing is that you get up and get active at least 150 minutes every week.

“Outdoor exercise can be adapted to anyone’s level of fitness,” advises Tina Vindum, the author of Tina Vindum’s Outdoor Fitness: Step Out of the Gym into the Best Shape of Your Life and the first outdoor fitness instructor accredited by the American Council on Exercise.

Terrapin Adventures can help! Conveniently located in Howard County, Maryland, between Baltimore and Washington DC, Terrapin Adventures features the ultimate challenge course (ropes course) with three levels taking you up to 40 ft. in the air! Each of our 19 traverses is designed to entertain and challenge participants of all fitness levels. We also offer several guided tours and outdoor activities, such as biking, backpacking, kayaking, and geocaching, just to name a few.

Find Your Next Adventure!

“Time spent in outdoor recreation leads to a range of benefits, from reduced obesity rates to strengthened family ties,” according to Robert Manning, professor of recreation management at the University of Vermont. And, quite frankly, it’s more enjoyable.

In a number of studies, participants were asked to go for two walks of the same time or distance — one inside on a treadmill or around a track, and the other outdoors. In virtually all instances, the participants reported higher levels of satisfaction when exercising outdoors.

“If outdoor activity encourages more activity, then it is a good thing,” says Jacqueline Kerr, a professor at the University of California, San Diego. After all, “despite the fitness industry boom, we are not seeing changes in national physical activity levels, so gyms are not the answer.”

If you have any questions, please call Terrapin Adventure at 301.725.1313, or email us at info@terrapinadventures.com to learn more.

Works Cited

  1. Pashley, Tina. “Physical, Social, Emotional & Intellectual Benefits of Outdoor Recreation.” LIVESTRONG.COM. Leaf Group, 26 May 2015. Web. 12 May 2017.
  2. Writer, Leaf Group. “Physical, Social, Emotional & Intellectual Benefits of Outdoor Recreation.” Back. Azcentral.com, 29 Sept. 2016. Web. 12 May 2017.
  3. Iliades, Chris . “The Benefits of Outdoor Exercise.” EverydayHealth.com. N.p., 09 Dec. 2009. Web. 12 May 2017.
  4. Reynolds, Gretchen. “The Benefits of Exercising Outdoors.” The New York Times. The New York Times, 21 Feb. 2013. Web. 12 May 2017.

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